27 June 2019

Over the last decade many changes to the emergency management arrangements have been introduced to improve the way Victoria prepares for, responds to and recovers from emergencies such as bushfire, flood, storm and heatwave.

Independent inquiries and reviews which have followed significant Victorian emergencies including the 2009 bushfires, the 2010–11 floods, the 2014 Hazelwood Coal Mine fire and 2016 thunderstorm asthma event have all aimed to improve our emergency management practices.

Inspector-General Tony Pearce is conducting a comprehensive review of the progress made in the emergency management sector since the 2009 Victorian Bushfires.

This review will not re-examine past emergencies, nor the findings or recommendations from independent inquiries and reviews such as the 2009 Victorian Bushfires Royal Commission.

The scope of this review is limited to reforms prior to March 2019.

The review recognises the emergency management sector is constantly evolving in its practices and approaches, including changes made in response to significant inquiries and reviews.

The review will examine if changes over the past 10 years are actually achieving better outcomes for Victorians – before, during and after emergencies.

This is an opportunity for communities to have their say on what they think is working well and what could be done better before, during and after emergencies.

The insights and experiences gathered from this consultation will be used to inform the review.

The primary goal of this review is to understand whether Victoria’s emergency management reform strategy has achieved the outcomes it set out to achieve for the sector, and importantly Victorian communities.

The Inspector-General will provide his report to government by December 2019.

For more information on this review and to give your views go to engage.vic.gov.au/tenyearreview (External link)

Individuals and organisations can contribute their views until Friday 16 August 2019.

Media contact: 03 8684 0313